Citizen Science

Wild Utah Project offers unique hands-on experiences to volunteers and interns involving the gathering and application of wildlife research data. We engage citizens in the field to collect and fill data gaps for species and associated habitats, as well as to support wildlife science and policy programs in contribution to positive outcomes for wildlife and habitat management. We also engage students at various levels of education and adult learners of all ages. We arrange field trips for high school environmental studies programs, which assist in data collection for our ongoing research efforts. We offer work to college interns, which provides course credits and research support for thesis projects. Wild Utah Project Internships for recent graduates allow for real world experience on meaningful actions for wildlife and the environment as interns begin their careers in science and/or management fields.


CITIZEN SCIENCE - 2018 FIELD SEASON

  Photo credit: UDWR

Photo credit: UDWR

Beaver Dam Analogue Construction

East Canyon Creek, Friday October 05 2018

(LAST CITIZEN SCIENCE OPPORTUNITY FOR 2018!) Earlier this summer we helped Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and Trout Unlimited conduct 'pre Beaver Dam Analogue' assessments to determine the current state of ecological function of East Canyon Creek, a tributary to the Weber River.  Now it's time to go back to build the BDAs, and we need Citizen volunteer power for this (and next year too, as we return to collect the "post BDA" ecological data).  Click button below to register!

  Photo credit: Austin Green

Photo credit: Austin Green

Trail Camera Study in the Central Wasatch   

April - August 2018 

Our inaugural season of the Central Wasatch mammal trail camera study was a huge success!  We’d like to thank our partners at the Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology Lab at the University of Utah, Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City Parks and Public Lands, and our volunteer citizen scientists. Together we installed and maintained nearly 200 camera stations across the Central Wasatch Mountains. Many volunteers will continue to support the study by sorting wildlife photos using the online platform, eMammal. The data will be shared with state and federal wildlife management agencies to inform conservation planning for the mammal communities of the Central Wasatch.

  Photo credit: UDWR

Photo credit: UDWR

Boreal Toad Surveys/Aquatic Habitat Assessments

April - August 2018

2018 marks our 5th year conducting boreal toad and aquatic habitat assessments as a collaboration with Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, U.S. Forest Service, Utah Geologic Survey, and the Hogle Zoo. The assessment field protocols were implemented by trained volunteer citizen scientists, who visited 25 sites up to 3 times each this year. This project continues to aid local wildlife managers in understanding the current occupied range for this rare species in the Wasatch mountains, and, importantly, potential sites for much needed boreal toad reintroduction there. And, our data is contributing to a  new state-wide predictive amphibian habitat model.