Healthy streams benefit many user groups and resources such as wildlife, agriculture, and recreationists. However, streams in the west are often degraded. Some of the degradation can be attributed to the extirpation of beaver from the ecosystem. The environmental benefits of beaver activity are well documented: beaver create aquatic and riparian habitats, provide hydrological connectivity, reduce erosion, control sediments, and reduce runoff and floods. Beaver recolonization in degraded streams may not be successful or feasible.

Low-tech restoration tools, such as human-made beaver dams, began as a means to achieve the environmental benefits of beaver. The utilization of low-tech tools for restoration is popular because it’s affordable and effective. These low-tech restoration activities also pave the way for successful beaver re-establishment.

We will do hands-on restoration work in streams. It’s a fun day outdoors and no experience is necessary.

 

 

 

Community Scientist at work installing a beaver dam analogue    photo by Lindsay Aman

Community Scientist at work installing a beaver dam analogue

photo by Lindsay Aman

Training Required? No

Commitment Level: Day-long projects

Field Season: August – October  

Requirements: Field work, gloves, shoes that can get wet or waders